Is tit for tat justified in Bhagavad Gita


The tit for tat theory is principally doctrine of karma explained in plain native language. As we sow so shall we reap says law of karma.

 

More than anything else Lord Krishna in Bhagavad Gita advocates practicing forgiveness whenever possible. Only when someone crosses limits does principle of forgiveness fails. We just could not forgive enemy at the door.

 

For the death of Lala Lajpat Rai Mahatma Gandhi is squarely responsible. In the name of so-called ahimsa (nonviolence) Mahatma Gandhi let Lala Lajpat Rai succumb to British lathies. Such grotesque display of Ahimsa is against the spirit of humanity.

 

Equanimity can never be practiced when facing brutal enemy. As in the battle of Mahabharata when everything failed every single effort by Lord Krishna to bring about peace failed, war between Kauravas and Pandavas was inevitable.

 

The responsibility of starting Mahabharata war did not squarely rest on the shoulders of Duryodhana alone, even Bhishma Pitamah (maternal grandfather) and Guru Dronacharya were equally responsible as not only elders but wise people. They failed to react in times of need.

 

By keeping quiet Bhishma Pitamah and Guru Dronacharya became accomplice to sinning by Duryodhana. And as law of karma says, we shall reap what we sow both Bhishma Pitamah and Guru Dronacharya suffered at the hands of Pandavas.

 

As per Bhagavad Gita one must initially try all logical solutions to solve the situation but when facing adharma (lawlessness), under no circumstances forgiveness can be practiced. If Bhishma Pitamah (maternal grandfather of Pandavas) sided evil and also Guru Dronacharya then both were equally to blame!

 

The law of Dharma says we can never side with evil at any stage of life, no matter what the logic or excuse. If one has erred, one has to bear fruits of negative karma indulged.

 

In case of all the three, Bhishma Pitamah Guru Dronacharya and Kauravas as a whole, it is tit for tat theory that was finally adopted by Lord Krishna. To re-establish Dharma (righteousness) against evil forces of adharma (lawlessness) Lord Krishna advises to face the adversary head-on.

 

Bhagavad Gita is never about preaching peace and Dharma in all circumstances of life. If evil bares its fangs then one has to face it with equal power and this is exactly what Arjuna did. After reaching state of enlightenment in the beginning of battle of Mahabharata and realizing he was primarily a spiritual traveler, a soul atman and not the manifest physical human form, Arjuna finally decides to fight the enemy consisting of close relatives and friends head-on.

 

As long as Arjuna considered himself, a product of flesh and bones he expressed cowardice. The moment he realized he was a spirit, a consciousness his attitude towards life immediately changed. Furthermore when Dharma is in doldrums, the situation is much more precarious and re-establishing Dharma at all costs is the only solution.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *